In Mansfield, Black Dolls Are A Journey to A Colorful & Hard Truth Past

A considerable amount of Black history in America has taken place in Boston. It was where Phillis Wheatley, a West African native—who emigrated stateside because she was sold as a slave—became the first Black female poet published in the U.S. It was once home to Malcolm X, who lived in Roxbury with his sister Ella Little-Collins. The capital can claim bragging rights to being the … Continue reading In Mansfield, Black Dolls Are A Journey to A Colorful & Hard Truth Past

I Read Those Harvey Weinstein Dissertations And Here Are The Worst of The Worst. #MeToo

I’m not sure if I’ve been avoided reading the Harvey Weinstein exposes out of fear of knowing too much or getting embroiled in a world so far removed from mine. By “world”, I mean, Hollywood. That elusive, oneiric place where the ordinary or undiscovered become stars, iconic, or party-hard infamous. The sexual harassment, abuse, and alleged (using this word only because it is unbearable for me to imagine, … Continue reading I Read Those Harvey Weinstein Dissertations And Here Are The Worst of The Worst. #MeToo

How Feel-Good Show “The Facts of Life” Tackled a KKK Problem, 35 Years Before Summer 2017

first published on MEDIUM, October 3, 2017, LINK The Facts of Life, similar to a lot of 1980s television, conjures warm-hearted memories of adolescent shenanigans and those same characters learning life lessons after an impassioned sit-down with an elder. Unlike a lot of sitcoms of the decade, The Facts of Life’s cast was pre-teen and teen girls, who were guided by affable matriarch Mrs. Edna Garrett (played … Continue reading How Feel-Good Show “The Facts of Life” Tackled a KKK Problem, 35 Years Before Summer 2017