What I Learned from Marie Claire This Month [May 2014]

For Marie Claire’s May 2014 “Our Annual Global Beauty Issue” (one of their four cover stars was the worldly Oscar-winner Lupita Nyong’o), the issue is dedicated to currently highlighting the best of beauty. Along their beauty insight from around the world and usual columns of the annoyances and awesome-ness of balancing life, dating, and being yourself at all times, if you read the issue as well, here’s what you likely learned the most:

In chronological order:

NEWS FEED (page):

  • Skin Saver: “A Japanese friend told me about pure, vitamin-rich camellia nut oil, which makes a great moisturizer”.

SURVIVAL GUIDE: TRAVEL EDITION

  • Q: “No matter how much water I drink, my sin and lips get beyond parched when I fly. How can I land looking dewy as a milkmaid?” A: NYC makeup artist Katey Denno says [to] pack snacks with a high water content and/or essential fatty acids (they help keep skin plump); avocado, seaweed salad, citrus fruit, sliced cucumber, and unsalted almonds. Before boarding, wash your face with a creamy face wash; pat a few drops of your favorite all-natural oil onto damp skin; and seal it with a moisturizer for sensitive skin. Be conscious of not licking your lips and use a nonpetroleum lip balm, like Burt’s Bees. Board the plane with at least two bottles of water, [and each time you do to the ladies’ room] spritz your face with a mist and reapply your face oil”.

BEAUTY: ROAD TEST

  • [In Russia]: Bigger is better in Russia, where winged eyeliner is decadent, dramatic, and more likely to catch the attention of a passing oligarch.
  • [In the Middle East]: Traditionally used to keep dust out, kohl is still smudged into the inner rims to brighten the whites of your eyes.

THE NEW FACE OF BEAUTY

The multi-racial population is growing around the world, and it’s projected that one in five Americans will be mixed-race by 2050. We asked actress Thandie Newton and makeup artist Kay Montano, founders of the blog ThandieKay.com to discuss the beauty industry’s evolution:

  • Thandie: “When I was 12, I went to a performing arts school where I was one of two girls who had dark skin. I would get principal roles because I was talented, but I was also brown. It was like my brownness became part of my visibility. Yet when I would visit Zimbabwe, where my mother is from, I was too “white”.
  • Thandie: “My beauty ideals were fictional-characters in books, wild girls who went against the grain. It was always girls who were on the outside because I felt like I wasn’t like anybody else”
  • Kay: “It took me a long time to understand that orange neutralizes the gray pigments that make skin look chalky”.
  • Kay: “Hopefully, [makeup companies] will realize the color of [our] skin is already exactly the color it should be. Now we just need more makeup products that represent that color and don’t try to change it”.
  • Thandie: “To me, healthy is beautiful. Doing yoga and getting that spark in your eyes-that’s beauty. If we don’t start understanding the word beauty in these terms, then we are missing the point completely”.

DOCTORS ORDERS:

  • Since 1975, they’ve used something called the Fitzpatrick scale to classify skin by how it reacts to UV light, from a complexion that burns quickly (Type I) to one that tans easily and never burns (Type VI).

BEAUTY ESSAY: Chic Lit

  • Garance Dore: “The truth is, [French women] come in every color, shape, and size. But we do follow certain rules that are so ingrained in us by our French mothers that perhaps we don’t even realize that others don’t live by them. And our rules are simple! For us, being chic and looking beautiful should appear-and I hat to use this word as much as you do-effortless. This is achieved with bon sens (common sense). For example, our mothers teach us to dress according to our figures. Clothes are hereto make us look beautiful, not the other way around. We’re pretty resistant to trends”.
  • Dore: “Of course, if anything bothers us, we’ll take care of it, but never within the fantasy of getting back to an age of innocence and naivete-we must enjoy what we have without questioning it too much. As long as each day is lived to the fullest, we have nothing to regret-only to be thankful for the beautiful women we’ve become, inside and out”.

10 SKIN SECRETS FROM THE ANCIENT WORLD:

  • Skullcap: A member of the mint family, this herb has been used topically in traditional Chinese medicine to treat acne, eczema, and psoriasis.

BEAUTY, FIELD GUIDE: MALI: THE BRAID WHISPERERS

  • “In Mali, and throughout Africa, hair has always been about ore than aesthetics. ‘Every major step of a woman’s life can be tracked in her hair’ says Mariam Thaore, a journalist in Mail’s capital of Bamanko and an expert on braiding. By glancing at a woman’s head, she explains, you would know if she’d just been married or her husband recently passed away. Mali has eight main ethnic groups and several smaller ones, and ‘each has its own set of styles for significant life events’ she explains.

That’s What She Said:

  • “Why does everyone need an audience for every moment of their life?” -Tina Fey
  • “Do every job you’re in like you’re going to do it for the rest of your life” -General Motors CEO Mary Barra
  • “We kept saying ‘Beyonce, Beyonce, Beyonce’ as a mantra to keep going and work harder” -Anna Kendrick

WHAT YOU THINK ABOUT…TRAVEL:

  • Have You Ever Traveled Solo? 49% Yes, 51% No

THE FORMULA FOR CHANGE, INSPIRATIONS:

  • “If you push through that feeling of being scared, really amazing things happen” -Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo!
  • “There have been many times that I’ve wanted to give up, go home, and hide under my bed…it always seems better the next day. Persistence is really important” -Susan Wojcicki, CEO of YouTube

101 IDEAS, GUNN LAWS:

  • Q: “Crop tops on the runway are usually paired with a matching skirt. What else can you wear if you don’t want to rock a monochromatic design from head to toe? A: “The crop top is one of the most difficult pieces to wear correctly, but putting it with anything high-waisted certainly helps”.

 MC@WORK: The Women of Netflix, Rewriting the Rules:

  • “While it’s true that cable has long been a pioneering venue for strong, interesting female characters-from Carmela Soprano to Carrie Bradshaw-for the most part, these roles have all hewed to the same template: “white, educated, middle to upper class, and inextricably linked to their romantic relationships”.

LOVE & SEX: My Self-Made Man

  • “I realized that I wasn’t attracted to the ‘human male’ as defined by an anatomy textbook”.

ALL WORDS, TIPS, ESSAYS, AND TIPS ARE OF THE ORIGINAL WORKS OF THE AUTHORS BYLINE IN MARIE CLAIRE’S 2014 ISSUE.

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