In Mansfield, Black Dolls Are A Journey to A Colorful & Hard Truth Past

A considerable amount of Black history in America has taken place in Boston. It was where Phillis Wheatley, a West African native—who emigrated stateside because she was sold as a slave—became the first Black female poet published in the U.S. It was once home to Malcolm X, who lived in Roxbury with his sister Ella Little-Collins. The capital can claim bragging rights to being the … Continue reading In Mansfield, Black Dolls Are A Journey to A Colorful & Hard Truth Past

How Feel-Good Show “The Facts of Life” Tackled a KKK Problem, 35 Years Before Summer 2017

first published on MEDIUM, October 3, 2017, LINK The Facts of Life, similar to a lot of 1980s television, conjures warm-hearted memories of adolescent shenanigans and those same characters learning life lessons after an impassioned sit-down with an elder. Unlike a lot of sitcoms of the decade, The Facts of Life’s cast was pre-teen and teen girls, who were guided by affable matriarch Mrs. Edna Garrett (played … Continue reading How Feel-Good Show “The Facts of Life” Tackled a KKK Problem, 35 Years Before Summer 2017

A Deeper Understanding of How The Manchester Attack Targeted Girlhood

During the digital maelstrom of what was social media users responding in shock and confusion at the Manchester Arena tragedy (that happened after Ariana Grande wrapped a concert as a part of her Dangerous Woman U.K. tour) one of the tweets I saw was from Jill Filipovic, author of the book, H-Spot: The Feminist Pursuit of Happiness. In a stern tone, she asked all of us to not find it … Continue reading A Deeper Understanding of How The Manchester Attack Targeted Girlhood