Demi Lovato Shared The Enliven Project’s Powerful Picture About The Lack Of Justice For Rape Victims

As most people know, I tend to get fired up about the things I believe in, and although my heart and intentions are always in the right place, unfortunately sometimes my passion gets the best of me and causes me to say things that I probably shouldn't say. And when doing so it takes away from the real reason I am speaking up in the first place. Our focus should be on the topic of victims of sexual and physical abuse being afraid to come forward with their stories. They're more likely to face retaliation and harassment than to see justice being served. Especially women. It baffles me that when it comes to serious issues like equality and abuse, too often women are not taken as seriously as men. All I want to see is women coming together and actually making a difference. A real change and shift in society. Everyone has their own way of giving support to others , and at the end of the day, helping victims is all that matters. Ultimately, the message I want people to hear is it's okay to come forward with your abuse and if you do decide to take action, you are not alone.

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You probably heard or read Demi Lovato‘s name, in the last few days, attached to the sad and controversial case of #FreeKesha. An online campaign, not started by Lovato, but shared and discussed by many as pop singer Kesha is fighting to be released from her Sony contract. Kesha wants out because she has accused her former go-to collaborator, famed pop producer Dr. Luke of drugging her, rape, and sexual assault starting in 2006 (her music career took off after the success of “Tik Tok” in 2009). From 2013, the creative relationship really began to fray between Kesha and Luke as the singer voiced that her input was often overlooked for the direction of her second LP (the underrated) Warrior and the unintentionally bad-timing of the pretty cheerful single “Die Young”, was a song she didn’t want to sing in the first place. (Just some weeks after it was released, the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy occurred in Connecticut).

From there, Kesha had an emotionally turbulent spiral as she entered rehab and her complaint against Luke was underway. But it’s only been this past week that the media, and celebrities, began to pay attention to the travesty of her case. She was photographed crying in a New York City court where a judge proclaimed that she shouldn’t be released from Sony because leaving her current 6-album contract would “irreparable harm” to Sony and that she could continue to make music and work with other producers who are not Dr. Luke. Sony granted her this form of leeway from her situation. Kesha, however, wants nothing to do with the record label that houses her alleged rapist. And Dr. Luke also owns a part of her contractual agreements. The judge essentially chose Sony over Kesha’s well-being and safety.

(Pool photo by Jefferson Siegel) - Kesha (center in white) cries as she learns she will not be released from her record label contract in Manhattan Supreme Court on Friday, February 19, 2016. A judge said she would not allow Kesha to leave her record label. (Pool Photo by Jefferson Siegel/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
(Pool photo by Jefferson Siegel) – Kesha (center in white) cries as she learns she will not be released from her record label contract in Manhattan Supreme Court on Friday, February 19, 2016. A judge said she would not allow Kesha to leave her record label. (Pool Photo by Jefferson Siegel/NY Daily News via Getty Images)

The photo of her tears went viral and plenty of media outlets suddenly expressed interest in #FreeKesha. It may be the biggest example in popular culture and media coverage, as of late, regarding rape, sexual assault and “rape culture” since the slew of women that came forward against former beloved comedian Bill Cosby. A lot of women artists have showed solidarity to Kesha, tweeting her support and well wishes for her request to be released from Sony. Lovato, in particular, was extremely vocal in her dismay at the case but also from the lack of heightened support from all women who claim to be “feminist” but when it comes to matters like Kesha, react quietly. Some thought that Lovato was indirectly referring to Taylor Swift, who, before her thoughtful donation of $250,000 for Kesha’s legal fees, hadn’t tweeted or said anything about the case, but has been painted in a media as a human billboard for (White) feminism.

NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 19: Kesha fans protest Sony Music Entertainment outside New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make eight more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY – FEBRUARY 19: Kesha fans protest Sony Music Entertainment outside New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make eight more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)

Lovato was then labelled as a hater and an opportunist of sorts for using #FreeKesha as a means to voice jealously or sub-tweets towards Swift, (it all sure escalated quickly), but truthfully, it seems the entire media is doing the same in some shape or form. This case has been going on for some time now. Why just now are think pieces being given the “Publish” button? Was the media, at least, trying to give the justice system the benefit of the doubt that it would do the right thing or sensitive choice and let Kesha free?

Yesterday, Lovato posted the above The Enliven Project infographic after another day of back and forths on Twitter and Instagram with commentators, and a fuller explanation of her inflamed tweets. Huffington Post Women published an article about the lasting effect of naysayers and those that doubt Kesha, and even Cosby’s accusers, as prime examples of why so few rapes, sexual assaults, and abuses, in general, go unreported. Let alone, the assholes jailed for their crimes. Rapists often do not get punished for their immoral decisions.

Kesha fans protest Sony Music Entertainment outside New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make three more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her.
Kesha fans protest Sony Music Entertainment outside New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make three more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her.

It was great and powerful of Lovato to post that uncomfortable, but necessary image on her Instagram. Let’s hope it stays there and the picture bigger of why #FreeKesha is important to the justice of too many victims of abusive experiences.

And as far as Kesha’s limited choices on what to do next, Gothamist summed it up in one sentence and it is depressing.

So currently, Kesha has few options: work on another album for Sony under the watch of her alleged abuser, produce her own music illegally, or stop working.

#FreeKesha

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