In Mansfield, Black Dolls Are A Journey to A Colorful & Hard Truth Past

A considerable amount of Black history in America has taken place in Boston. It was where Phillis Wheatley, a West African native—who emigrated stateside because she was sold as a slave—became the first Black female poet published in the U.S. It was once home to Malcolm X, who lived in Roxbury with his sister Ella Little-Collins. The capital can claim bragging rights to being the … Continue reading In Mansfield, Black Dolls Are A Journey to A Colorful & Hard Truth Past

A Deeper Understanding of How The Manchester Attack Targeted Girlhood

During the digital maelstrom of what was social media users responding in shock and confusion at the Manchester Arena tragedy (that happened after Ariana Grande wrapped a concert as a part of her Dangerous Woman U.K. tour) one of the tweets I saw was from Jill Filipovic, author of the book, H-Spot: The Feminist Pursuit of Happiness. In a stern tone, she asked all of us to not find it … Continue reading A Deeper Understanding of How The Manchester Attack Targeted Girlhood

In Loving Memory of Langston Hughes, Who Passed Away 50 Years Today

James Mercer Langston Hughes, simply known to us as Langston Hughes, was only 65 years old when he died of complications from prostate cancer on May 22, 1967. That was 50 years ago today. The Joplin, Missouri born-raised in Lawrence, Kansas native, years before his death, was a defining figure of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s. It was a magical decade in which an explosion … Continue reading In Loving Memory of Langston Hughes, Who Passed Away 50 Years Today